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Landowners and New Event Venues

   

British Eventing are always looking for new land to become an event venue

Looking for an alternative use for your land? British Eventing is always looking for new venues to fit in the calendar in all areas of the United Kingdom. If you are a landowner, British Eventing can help find an organisational team to help or if you already have a team in place, we'll help you through the process of becoming affiliated.

Landowners FAQs

 

How much land do I need?
I own the land but need an organiser. How does this sort of arrangement operate?

If I can arrange a suitable amount of land and am prepared to take on the organisation myself, what does BE do and what assistance can they offer me?
What do I have to do to become affiliated?
Are there any Health & Safety implications?
Is there any financial assistance available to enable me to get the event going?
Can I expect to make money out of the event once it is going, and if so, how much?

How much land do I need?

For a Novice and/or BE90 or BE100 Event, good access for cars and horse boxes, some of which are very large these days, is essential.  A suitable car parking area, lorry park and administrative area for tents, caravans and trade stands will occupy, say, three acres.  The Dressage arenas and riding-in area will amount to at least two acres of relatively flat ground and the Show Jumping arena, practice arena and collecting ring will require at least another acre.  The most difficult part to quantify is the ground required for the cross country course.  Sufficient suitable land for a course of 1 - 1.75 miles (1600m - 2800m) is needed.  There are a few very good Events fitted into an area with as few as about a hundred acres.  An Intermediate or Advanced Event of course requires more land.

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I own the land but need an organiser.  How does this sort of arrangement operate?

This is frequently the case.  Somewhat naturally the success of it is almost entirely dependent upon a successful relationship being established between the Organiser of the Event and the Landowner.  It is strongly recommended that an agreement be drawn up between the two parties from an early stage regardless of how well they knew each other (we provide guidance on this).  The financial arrangements are covered later.

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If I can arrange a suitable amount of land and am prepared to take on the organisation myself, what does BE do and what assistance can they offer me?

Once BE is satisfied that there is a potentially suitable organiser and site available for a new Event, it will provide expert advice throughout the planning stages of the event.  As soon as the new event is affiliated to BE an extremely comprehensive guide will be sent to the new Organiser called “Eventing Guide”.  This publication seeks to cover every question a new Organiser can think of!  Additionally, BE is responsible for the safe conduct of the event, for enforcing the rules and for resolving objections. In slightly more detail - there is a Regional Director and the Chief Executive at Stoneleigh appoints a Technical Adviser to your new event and between them they advise on the layout of the three phases of the event - Dressage, Show Jumping and Cross Country.  You will need to employ a course builder.  BE can suggest names from amongst its Accredited Designers and Builders. The Technical Adviser will be responsible for overseeing the building.  As the preparations for the event progress and plans evolve, they can advise on every aspect of your event.

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What do I have to do to become affiliated?

If you wish to proceed with the idea of establishing a new Event, the Regional Director will arrange to visit you at the site.  During that visit he will establish the suitability of the land for an Event and will discuss with you the proposed organisation of the event.
Assuming that both aspects are potentially satisfactory and that you, after finding out more about what is involved still wish to go ahead, he will try and establish with you the most suitable time of the year, or indeed a specific date when you would like to run the event.
The Regional Director and you now enter into negotiations to try and agree a firm date for the forthcoming season.  This can be a very difficult business because whilst you clearly have constraints on dates, to avoid clashing with, say, your local point-to-point or agricultural show, the Events Committee must ensure that there is a balanced programme of events without geographically adjacent clashing fixtures.  Because priority is given to existing events, this process can often take some time.  Once an acceptable date has been agreed your new Event is affiliated.
Affiliation to BE is conditional upon acceptance of the BE Rules, a copy of which will be sent to you when your event is affiliated.

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Are there any Health & Safety implications?


Yes, and they are quite far-reaching, but it is all explained in the Rules and Guidelines.  Much of it is already covered by the suggested way of running your event and the rest is largely informed common sense.

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Is there any financial assistance available to enable me to get the event going?

Yes - loans may be made, at favourable terms, in order to help you pay for the building of the cross country course.  The sums available will not cover the whole cost of the course but they assist and are usually repayable over three years.
BE also has a Development Fund which events can apply to for funding with specific projects, i.e. developing their XC Course.

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Can I expect to make money out of the event once it is going, and if so, how much?

A well organised Novice/Pre-Novice/Intro Event should be able to show a small but reasonable financial return if the capital outlay is written off over, say, three years.  Any surplus can be increased through a main sponsor or section sponsors for the prize money and any secondary sponsorship for such items as the cross country fences.
There are many variables to be taken into account when considering the financial implications of a One Day Event; in some cases a rent is paid for the use of the ground, whilst others make a donation to organisations like the local hunt or Riding for the Disabled, for the services they provide.
If you are solely the land owner, the profit share specifics should be included in your contract/agreement with your organiser. 

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There's more specific organisational detail in the Event Organiser section.

If you have any further questions, do not hesitate to email us using the form below.

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